Useful Resources about the Solow Model

We’ve been updating the blog with a series of short, simple, easy to read essays about the Solow Model. If you’d like to read the entire series, just click here, and read in reverse chronological order.

We haven’t used a single chart, equation, graphic or video, to talk about the Solow mode, and each essay is no longer than around 500 words each. But reading all of them should give you a fairly good idea about the Solow model.

Think of these essays as appetizers, though. They are intended to whet the appetite, not fill you up. However, if your appetite has indeed been whetted, you might want to take a look at these resources to understand more about the Solow model.

Marginal Revolution University (MRU) is an excellent online resource for learning more about economics in general. Started by two professors from George Mason University, Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok, it is a wealth of material, in the form of videos, for understanding both basic and advanced economics. Here is the link for their videos about the Solow Model.

We wouldn’t especially recommend the Wikipedia article about the Solow model, because it isn’t the most intuitive version going around. But if you are comfortable with some math, and know your way around the Solow model well, you could take a look at it.

Any introductory textbook on macroeconomics will also cover the Solow model, because it really is the workhorse model for thinking about the long run growth story for any nation. Dornbusch, Fisher and Startz have a good book out there, but really, take your pick – almost any book will do.

We hope you have enjoyed thinking about the intuition behind the Solow model, and we hope you find the resources put up above useful.

In the next post, we’ll move away from the Solow model, and talk about the most basic model in economics – the supply and demand framework.

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