Postwar Economic Problems, The Book

Reading this blogpost helped me land upon this link. The book is titled Postwar Economic Problems, edited by Seymour E. Harris.

The introduction begins with the following sentence:

“Win the war first” is a sensible slogan. But all agree that if we do not also win the peace, we shall have lost the war.

It is hard not to be hooked!

From the same chapter, a little further down, a whiff of a familiar problem:

It will be necessary to stimulate consumer spending if a high income level is to be attained and maintained. Provision of security and an accompanying stimulation of spending; the further spread of education; an improved distribution of income; community spending for consumption—all these will be required.

The authors include, among others, Hansen, Samuelson, Haberler, Leontief, Schumpeter, Kindleberger and Lerner.

You could do a lot worse than skim through the book right now. The numbers aren’t relevant today, of course, but the line of thinking is bound to be.

Links about these changing times

  1. Agnes Callard on wanting to feel pain:
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    “We don’t consciously choose to feel pangs of guilt or waves of regret, in the way that we consciously choose what novel to read. Still, we can assimilate the two sorts of cases if we introduce a hypothetical: Imagine you are offered a pill that would make you immune to regretful or guilty thoughts. Would you choose take it? If your worry is that those thoughts are important for steering you away from future wrongdoing, let me assure you I’ve built that functionality into the pill: You won’t behave any worse for having taken it. You’ll just stop having negative feelings.”
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  2. Via MR, social distancing and examinations in South Korea. (I’m not a fan)
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  3. Scott Adams has been calling it correctly for a while. Read more Dilbert!
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  4. Again via MR, a lovely list.
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  5. What will change, culturally speaking? Telecommuting will be the default, and in the years to come, maybe you’ll have to ask the manager for permission to go to office.
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    “But the pandemic is forcing these investments in industries where telework is possible, with more people learning how to use remote technology. As a result, we may see a more permanent shift toward telecommuting. As the economist Susan Athey recently told the Washington Post, “People will change their habits, and some of these habits will stick. There’s a lot of things where people are just slowly shifting, and this will accelerate that.””