Tech: Links for 17th September, 2019

  1. “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity“.
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  2. Jason Snell reviews the iPhone launch event.
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  3. … as does Ben Thompson.
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  4. The importance of the U1 chip.
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  5. I don’t quite remember how I landed up here, but this was interesting for a variety of reasons. On a company called OKCredit.
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Tech: Links for 10th September, 2019

Five tech products that I really like the sound of. The cost of this blog is two hours of Googling, but on balance? Worth it. Note: I haven’t used these products – this is neither a recommendation nor an endorsement. I just enjoyed learning more about them, and the problem they’re trying to solve.

  1. Airtable.
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  2. Zapier.
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  3. Notion.
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  4. Slack. I’ve been trying to get folks at Gokhale Institute to use Hangouts, but the struggle is real!
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  5. Todoist.

Tech: Links for 3rd September, 2019

  1. “But analog storage takes up a lot of room. So sending the bulk of human knowledge to space will require a lot of compression. To do this, Spivack tapped Bruce Ha, a scientist who developed a technique for engraving high-resolution, nano-scale images into nickel. Ha uses lasers to etch an image into glass and then deposits nickel, atom by atom, in a layer on top. The images in the resulting nickel film look holographic and can be viewed using a microscope capable of 1000x magnification—a technology that has been available for hundreds of years.”
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    Tardigrades on the moon.
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  2. For folks who ask how to go about learning R. Start here.
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  3. As I have mentioned earlier, I have the app, Peak. I don’t know how much of an impact it has on my mental performance, but I enjoy the routine(s) and am slowly getting better at all the games. They celebrate their fifth anniversary today.
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  4. “When he saw the gilded letters of the Trump hotel, he gave a gleeful chuckle. “Out of all the American Presidents, he is the only one whose speeches I can understand directly, without translation,” he remarked. “There are no big words or complicated grammar. Everything he says is reduced to the simplest possible formulation.””
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    If I could have, I would have excerpted the entire article. An interview with Cixin Liu.
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  5. Teachable.com – of course I would be interested, wouldn’t I?

Tech: Links for 27th August, 2019

I got the day off today!

Harsh Doshi, an alumnus of GIPE and a friend, has written today’s post about bitcoins.  Thanks, Harsh.

He has, he wrote to me in an email, used my style – which made me realize I have one. Still, here you go five (but who’s counting) links about bitcoins:

  1. Before trying to understand how the Bitcoin took form of money, commodity and security – something truly unique – it is important to understand what was the idea behind the genesis of the bitcoin. Read this whitepaper, authored by Satoshi Nakamoto. We are still unaware of who s/he truly is, or are we?
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  2. The Economist explains lucidly what bitcoin is and how it works.
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  3. Just what is bitcoin mining?
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  4. Bitcoin, or in general crypto, is looked at as an advanced technology with the likes of AI and ML. But too much tech may also not be necessarily prone to disasters, one that has blocked $137 million.
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  5. The Government of India and RBI, along with SEBI have banned cryptocurrencies and hailed the idea of blockchain, a decentralised ledger technology. Here is an article debunking the myth that separating the two will be good.
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  6. Bonus: One of India’s most articulate voices on Bitcoin, here in his 20 min long TEDx Talk

Tech: Links for 22nd August, 2019

  1. “1. first bionic hand with a sense of touch that can be worn outside a laboratory
    2. development of a new 3D bioprinting technique, which allows the more accurate printing of soft tissue organs, such as lungs
    3. a method through which the human innate immune system may possibly be trained to more efficiently respond to diseases and infections
    4. a new form of biomaterial based delivery system for therapeutic drugs, which only release their cargo under certain physiological conditions, thereby potentially reducing drug side-effects in patients
    5. an announcement of human clinical trials, that will encompass the use of CRISPR technology to modify the T cells of patients with multiple myeloma, sarcoma and melanoma cancers, to allow the cells to more effectively combat the cancers, the first of their kind trials in the US
    6. a blood test (or liquid biopsy) that can detect eight common cancer tumors early. The new test, based on cancer-related DNA and proteins found in the blood, produced 70% positive results in the tumor-types studied in 1005 patients
    7. a method of turning skin cells into stem cells, with the use of CRISPR
    the creation of two monkey clones for the first time
    8. a paper which presents possible evidence that naked mole-rats do not face increased mortality risk due to aging”
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    That is an excerpt from an excerpt, but I found the list astonishing. These are advancements from only the field of biology, only from 2018… and as the article goes on to say, only from January 2018. Remarkable. I know very little of how life sciences work, but the article was very informative on that score.
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  2. Do Uber and Lyft contribute to congestion? Note the funding agencies.
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  3. Benedict Evans on whether Netflix is a TV business or a tech business.
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  4. This link comes via MR, and Tyler Cowen said it is Tiebout Twitter. I prefer Voting With your Tweets.
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  5. “But perhaps he also sensed that power in society is shifting from the institutions he oversaw, to those that distribute private capital—it wouldn’t be the wrong read, even if it’s an unsettling one.”
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    A not altogether pretty look at the VC industry and its evolution over time.

Tech: Links for 20th August, 2019

Five online resources that are free, and that help you be a better student in today’s set.

  1. An utterly beautiful way to learn statistics. That is not hyperbole.
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  2. If you are a data nerd, you will have already heard of Kaggle. If you aren’t, welcome to the club.
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  3. The magic of Wolfram Alpha. If you aren’t sure about how to start, try the “Surprise Me” link on the home page
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  4. If you are using Google Classroom, the latest update might interest you.
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  5. Try the Socratic app?

Tech: Links for 13th July, 2019

Five articles by Michael Nielsen. If you aren’t familiar with Michael Nielsen, this is a great place to start!

  1. His version of how to write better.
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  2. A scientist’s explanation of Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem.
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  3. May this come true, and right soon.
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  4. “In the US House of Representatives, 61 percent of Democrats voted for the Civil Rights Act, while a much higher percentage, 80 percent, of Republicans voted for the Act. You might think that we could conclude from this that being Republican, rather than Democrat, was an important factor in causing someone to vote for the Civil Rights Act. However, the picture changes if we include an additional factor in the analysis, namely, whether a legislator came from a Northern or Southern state. If we include that extra factor, the situation completely reverses, in both the North and the South. Here’s how it breaks down:North: Democrat (94 percent), Republican (85 percent)

    South: Democrat (7 percent), Republican (0 percent)

    Yes, you read that right: in both the North and the South, a larger fraction of Democrats than Republicans voted for the Act, despite the fact that overall a larger fraction of Republicans than Democrats voted for the Act.”
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    One of my favorite problems from statistics: Simpson’s Paradox. And an old frenemy: correlation is not causation.
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  5. Memory, and how to get better at it.